You won’t believe how easy it is to grow more spring onions from the ones you bought at the store. This is an easy gardening project that anyone can do even without experience. And there are so many ways you can use the endless supply of green onions in cooking.

Consider the climate you have before planting the cuttings. If you live in a cold climate area it is best to do this in the spring. Here in California, I am able to grow spring onions in the fall and spring because of our mild weather.

For the container, I choose one with a depth of at least 6 inches. Spring onions have shallow roots and don’t need a lot of space. It could be any width, depending on how many green onion cuttings you want to plant.

The potting soil I use is Kellogg Organic Plus which already contains plant nutrients and organic fertilizers in it. If that is not available, I buy regular potting soil and mix in some Miracle Gro organic granular fertilizer. The back of the package specify the dosage you need to put in the soil.

Here are the method and steps I do……

  1. Cut about 3 inches off the bottom root part of the spring onions. (Reserve the upper green part for cooking).
  2. Fill a container with organic potting soil leaving 1 inch space on the top.
  3. Plant each cutting in the potting soil just deep enough to cover the roots. Firm the soil with you hands. Space them to about 1-2 inches apart.
  4. Water the spring onion cuttings and place the container in a shady area for a week.
  5. Make sure to water cuttings when dry every few days.
  6. After a week, transfer the container in full sun and continue watering as needed. At this time you will already see more green growth.

After a few weeks you will have longer green parts on the spring onions to cut and use for cooking. Chop them and add it to salads, stir fry, hamburgers, meat loaf, vegetable patties or omelet. You can also use it as garnish to sprinkle on top of any dish.

The good part is, if the spring onions die out eventually, you can start over and plant new cuttings to enjoy later. I like planting in succession so I don’t run out.